In terms of NFC, is Apple becoming irrelevant? Or is that a very dangerous thought?

 

 

Like everyone else interested in NFC, I was waiting for Apple’s announcement earlier this week. Had Apple finally added NFC to the iPhone with the release of the 5S? No. Again.

I’ve been working in NFC for a relatively long time (almost 9 years). Year after year, release after release, we all held our breath hoping Apple would make the move to NFC. We’ve all speculated endlessly on what Apple plans for NFC (more about that next week). We all expected Apple to be the game-changer for NFC. And we’ve all been disappointed as Apple bypassed NFC over and over again.

But this time, the response is a bit different. For the first time, Apple is not seen as the holy grail, but perhaps as missing the NFC boat and falling behind. What a change – even from a year ago! For example:

“The absence of NFC is starting to make every iOS device feel like it’s missing an extremely important feature.”

“Apple may ultimately regret its decision not to include NFC in the iPhone 5, Gartner’s [Mark] Hung said. ‘If they don’t put NFC in an iPhone soon, they risk being a technology laggard,’ he said.”

“Apple seems to be waiting a long, long time to jump on that NFC train… “

We’ve noted similar reactions on Twitter. Lots of yawns, too. At least in terms of NFC, is Apple becoming irrelevant? Or is that a very dangerous thought, because when Apple finally does add NFC (and it will, eventually), will it still have the huge impact we all expected years ago?

Coming soon: What will Apple actually do with NFC? It seems like everyone I talk to predicts something different. We’ll take a look at some of the more likely scenarios. Feel free to send your thoughts to paula@nfcbootcamp.com


About the Author:

Paula Berger has been working in NFC since 2005 in a variety of roles. She is currently involved in expanding the NFC Bootcamp, the only globally standardized NFC training program. She was VP Marketing and Communication at Sequent, an NFC Trusted Service Manager (TSM). She was Executive Director of the NFC Forum for six years, from the association’s launch through the rollout of the certification program. Paula has been a writer for NFC World publications and she is on the Planning Committee for the NFC Circle Boston, a program of the MIT Enterprise Forum that supports the development, adoption and commercial success of NFC. Paula has extensive experience in communication of all sorts and in building and running training programs.

Paula Berger

Paula Berger has been working in NFC since 2005 in a variety of roles. She is currently involved in expanding the NFC Bootcamp, the only globally standardized NFC training program. She was VP Marketing and Communication at Sequent, an NFC Trusted Service Manager (TSM). She was Executive Director of the NFC Forum for six years, from the association’s launch through the rollout of the certification program. Paula has been a writer for NFC World publications and she is on the Planning Committee for the NFC Circle Boston, a program of the MIT Enterprise Forum that supports the development, adoption and commercial success of NFC. Paula has extensive experience in communication of all sorts and in building and running training programs.

2 Comments:

  1. Apple is giving bluetooth low energy the front seat. It is a more expensive, more sophisticated and more complicated platform. It’s also in every idevice since the 4s. Once developers and others unleash their ibeacons, we will see if this gains any traction.

    t seems like here in the US, we need a massive NFC platform to roll out (such as paying for subway or train) before NFC will gain acceptance.

  2. The one main issue with BLE is for payments as it is not secure. If BlueTooth was secure we would have had mobile payments on it long before now. The other big issue, in at least the way it has been presented is a push notification when you come into a store or location area instead of pull, which is what NFC does. You pull when you want, where you want. At what point with push notification do people turn it off. Think of how spam started on e-mail than next thing people have filters and than software tools change. I am afraid that this will happen with BLE in this specific area. I know there are other areas to BLE put this was one of the big pushes for it.

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